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Buddhist Ghost Writer

Buddhist philosophy for the modern age

Buddhist wisdom for the week of February 19, 2017

Before comparing yourself with others, win the battle with yourself. Strive to be better today than yesterday, and better tomorrow than today.

— Daisaku Ikeda

Nam myoho renge kyo

pink-bud

Buddhist wisdom for the week of February 12, 2017

The important thing is to hold firm to your beliefs without being influenced or swayed by what others do or say. Those who live this way are strong and free of regret. What matters most is how you lead your life–not what those around you are doing.

— Daisaku Ikeda

Nam myoho renge kyo

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Buddhist wisdom for the week of February 5, 2017


People who are rooted in the here and now, who are not defeeated by their limitations, who don’t compare themselves to others, who confidently advance along their chosen path–such people are happy, such people are truly great.

— Daisaku Ikeda

Nam myoho renge kyo

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Buddhist wisdom for the week of January 29, 2017

The struggle between happiness and unhappiness is the story of human existence. The struggle between peace and war is the history of the human race. The power that leads us to eternal victory amid these struggles is the power of good within us.

— Daisaku Ikeda

Nam myoho renge kyo

kleenex

Buddhist wisdom for the week of January 22, 2017

Of course, people want to live long. But in the end, what matters more is what we have been able to leave behind–the value we have created in our lives, the number of people we have made happy and how much we have been able to grow and expand as a person.

— Daisaku Ikeda

Nam myoho renge kyo

Dark blue

Buddhist wisdom for the week of January 15, 2017

Relative happiness is happiness that depends on things outside ourselves, such as affluence or social standing. While the happiness such things bring us is certainly real, it shatters easily when external conditions alter. Absolute happiness, on the other hand, is something we must find within. It means establishing a state of life in which we are never defeated by difficulties, and where just being alive is a source of great joy.

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Buddhist wisdom for the week of January 8, 2017

Anyone can hit a wall. The anguish felt then is proof of one’s desire to move forward. But all is for naught if you falter at that moment. Action–that is the key to breaking through an impasse.

— Daisaku Ikeda

Nam myoho renge kyo

lavenders

Buddhist wisdom for the week of January 1, 201

New year’s day marks the first day, the first month, the beginning of the year, and the start of spring. A person who celebrates this day will accumulate virtue and be loved by all, just as the moon becomes full gradually, moving from west to east, and as the sun shines more brightly, traveling from east to west.

— Nichiren Daishonin

Nam myoho renge kyo

home-depot_edited

Buddhist wisdom for the week of December 25, 2016

If a person is hungry, we should give them bread. When there is no bread, we can at least give words that nourish. To a person who looks ill or is physically frail, we can turn the conversation to some subject that will lift their spirits and fill them with the hope and determination to get better. Let us give something to each person we meet: joy, courage, hope, assurance, or philosophy, wisdom, a vision for the future. Let us always give something.

— Daisaku Ikeda

Nam myoho renge kyo

white lotus

 

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